Wholeness

For intuitive and critical discussions, from spirituality to theological doctrines. Fair warning: because the subject matter is personal, moderation is strict.

Moderator: Dan~

Re: Wholeness

Postby felix dakat » Wed Aug 19, 2020 3:48 pm

Those of us who are relatively high in neuroticism can expect to find help in stoic philosophers like Epictetus, cognitive therapy, New Thought practices and positive thinking. Such practices can help us to achieve the psychic balance necessary for a sense of wholeness.
The purpose of my life would seem to be to express the truth as I discover it, but in such a manner that it is completely devoid of authority. By having no authority, by being seen by all as utterly unreliable, I express the truth and put everyone in a contradictory position where they can only save themselves by making the truth their own.
Soren Kierkegaard– Journals, 432
User avatar
felix dakat
Janitor
 
Posts: 8871
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:20 am
Location: east of eden

Re: Wholeness

Postby promethean75 » Wed Aug 19, 2020 4:59 pm

We'll need a context, of course.
promethean75
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3388
Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2019 7:10 pm

Re: Wholeness

Postby felix dakat » Wed Aug 19, 2020 6:31 pm

"Can I explain the Friend to one for whom he is no Friend?"

Jalal-uddin Rumi
The purpose of my life would seem to be to express the truth as I discover it, but in such a manner that it is completely devoid of authority. By having no authority, by being seen by all as utterly unreliable, I express the truth and put everyone in a contradictory position where they can only save themselves by making the truth their own.
Soren Kierkegaard– Journals, 432
User avatar
felix dakat
Janitor
 
Posts: 8871
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:20 am
Location: east of eden

Re: Wholeness

Postby iambiguous » Wed Aug 19, 2020 6:48 pm

promethean75 wrote:We'll need a context, of course.


I already tried that:

felix dakat wrote:
iambiguous wrote:
felix dakat wrote:To paraphrase CG Jung, wholeness is a gift which can't be fabricated by art or science. You have to grow into it.


We'll need a context of course. :-k


See above. There's already a context.


See above, and find one.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
User avatar
iambiguous
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 37617
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 8:03 pm
Location: baltimore maryland

Re: Wholeness

Postby felix dakat » Wed Aug 19, 2020 7:21 pm

iambiguous wrote:
I already tried that:

felix dakat wrote:
iambiguous wrote:
We'll need a context of course. :-k


See above. There's already a context.


See above, and find one.


Can I explain the Friend to one for whom he is no Friend?"

Jalal-uddin Rumi
The purpose of my life would seem to be to express the truth as I discover it, but in such a manner that it is completely devoid of authority. By having no authority, by being seen by all as utterly unreliable, I express the truth and put everyone in a contradictory position where they can only save themselves by making the truth their own.
Soren Kierkegaard– Journals, 432
User avatar
felix dakat
Janitor
 
Posts: 8871
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:20 am
Location: east of eden

Re: Wholeness

Postby iambiguous » Wed Aug 19, 2020 7:42 pm

felix dakat wrote:Can I explain the Friend to one for whom he is no Friend?"

Jalal-uddin Rumi


Now all we need to do is to connect this to the OP...

felix dakat wrote:To paraphrase CG Jung, wholeness is a gift which can't be fabricated by art or science. You have to grow into it.


...and choose a particular context in which there might be conflicting assumptions regarding what it means to embody wholeness.

You know, as long as that particular context is never actually named.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
User avatar
iambiguous
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 37617
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 8:03 pm
Location: baltimore maryland

Re: Wholeness

Postby felix dakat » Wed Aug 19, 2020 7:48 pm

iambiguous wrote:
felix dakat wrote:Can I explain the Friend to one for whom he is no Friend?"

Jalal-uddin Rumi


Now all we need to do is to connect this to the OP...

felix dakat wrote:To paraphrase CG Jung, wholeness is a gift which can't be fabricated by art or science. You have to grow into it.


...and choose a particular context in which there might be conflicting assumptions regarding what it means to embody wholeness.

You know, as long as that particular context is never actually named.


You are the context O "fragmented" one.
The purpose of my life would seem to be to express the truth as I discover it, but in such a manner that it is completely devoid of authority. By having no authority, by being seen by all as utterly unreliable, I express the truth and put everyone in a contradictory position where they can only save themselves by making the truth their own.
Soren Kierkegaard– Journals, 432
User avatar
felix dakat
Janitor
 
Posts: 8871
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:20 am
Location: east of eden

Re: Wholeness

Postby iambiguous » Wed Aug 19, 2020 8:28 pm

felix dakat wrote:
iambiguous wrote:
felix dakat wrote:Can I explain the Friend to one for whom he is no Friend?"

Jalal-uddin Rumi


Now all we need to do is to connect this to the OP...

felix dakat wrote:To paraphrase CG Jung, wholeness is a gift which can't be fabricated by art or science. You have to grow into it.


...and choose a particular context in which there might be conflicting assumptions regarding what it means to embody wholeness.

You know, as long as that particular context is never actually named.


You are the context O "fragmented" one.


That's Stooge talk: making me the issue.

Oh, and by the way, it's official: you're Larry. :wink:
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
User avatar
iambiguous
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 37617
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 8:03 pm
Location: baltimore maryland

Re: Wholeness

Postby felix dakat » Wed Aug 19, 2020 9:11 pm

You wish to objectify religion. To discover true religion you must find it in yourself. So yes it's all about you.
The purpose of my life would seem to be to express the truth as I discover it, but in such a manner that it is completely devoid of authority. By having no authority, by being seen by all as utterly unreliable, I express the truth and put everyone in a contradictory position where they can only save themselves by making the truth their own.
Soren Kierkegaard– Journals, 432
User avatar
felix dakat
Janitor
 
Posts: 8871
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:20 am
Location: east of eden

Re: Wholeness

Postby felix dakat » Sun Aug 23, 2020 4:33 pm

Boy psychology...is charged with the struggle for dominance of others, in some form or another. And it is often caught up in the wounding of self, as well as others. It is sadomasochistic. Man psychology is always the opposite. It is nurturing and generative, not wounding and destructive.

Moore, Robert. King, Warrior, Magician, Lover (pp. 5-6). HarperOne. Kindle Edition.


Not that anyone would ever practice "Boy psychology" here on ILP. :wink:
The purpose of my life would seem to be to express the truth as I discover it, but in such a manner that it is completely devoid of authority. By having no authority, by being seen by all as utterly unreliable, I express the truth and put everyone in a contradictory position where they can only save themselves by making the truth their own.
Soren Kierkegaard– Journals, 432
User avatar
felix dakat
Janitor
 
Posts: 8871
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:20 am
Location: east of eden

Re: Wholeness

Postby felix dakat » Sun Aug 23, 2020 11:26 pm

All faith is somewhat idolatrous because it depends on a psychic image. Psychologically faith is our connection, what psycho-analysis calls a cathexis, to an internal object. The energy that is holding your psyche together may be coming through your image of yourself. In other words your faith may be in your self-image. If that's where you're getting your energy and that's pulling you together and enabling you to stand against the destructive forces in your life, then it's working somewhat. Good.
The purpose of my life would seem to be to express the truth as I discover it, but in such a manner that it is completely devoid of authority. By having no authority, by being seen by all as utterly unreliable, I express the truth and put everyone in a contradictory position where they can only save themselves by making the truth their own.
Soren Kierkegaard– Journals, 432
User avatar
felix dakat
Janitor
 
Posts: 8871
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:20 am
Location: east of eden

Re: Wholeness

Postby felix dakat » Mon Aug 24, 2020 6:50 pm

American biologist and evolutionary theorist, Bret Weinstein's trenchant critique of Dawkins' view of religion as a "mind virus". I take Weinstein's view of religion as an evolutionary adaptation to be generally supportive of phenomenological approaches such as I am attempting here.

https://youtu.be/rm8FksjlJtM
The purpose of my life would seem to be to express the truth as I discover it, but in such a manner that it is completely devoid of authority. By having no authority, by being seen by all as utterly unreliable, I express the truth and put everyone in a contradictory position where they can only save themselves by making the truth their own.
Soren Kierkegaard– Journals, 432
User avatar
felix dakat
Janitor
 
Posts: 8871
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:20 am
Location: east of eden

Re: Wholeness

Postby iambiguous » Mon Aug 24, 2020 7:15 pm

felix dakat wrote: You wish to objectify religion.


No, I wish to examine that which particular individuals have come to conclude about God and religion as that relates to the behaviors they choose from day to day as that relates to what they imagine the fate of "I" to be after they die.

And given how the lives individuals live around the globe can vary in many extraordinarily profound ways, what on earth would it even mean to "objectify" their conflicting accounts of God and/or religion?

felix dakat wrote: To discover true religion you must find it in yourself. So yes it's all about you.


Okay, let's examine this in the context of human history. Countless people have either been indoctrinated as children to embody the one "true religion", or they took to their own paths and came to conclude that the one "true religion" was their own. And, so far, historically, that has engendered a lot of paths: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_r ... traditions

Now, how about you? What are the odds that the spiritual path that you are on "here and now" is indeed the one true path.

Or, instead, is the belief that there is one true path of more importance to the religious objectivists?

Their own is just what it happens to be.

As for the OP...

To paraphrase CG Jung, wholeness is a gift which can't be fabricated by art or science. You have to grow into it.


...let's bring that down to earth and explore the idea of "wholeness" by intertwining it into a particular context where we might come upon conflicting points of view regarding that which is of most interest to me: the existential relationship between morality and immortality.

What might be wholly understood and communicated here.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
User avatar
iambiguous
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 37617
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 8:03 pm
Location: baltimore maryland

Re: Wholeness

Postby felix dakat » Mon Aug 24, 2020 7:40 pm

iambiguous wrote:
felix dakat wrote: You wish to objectify religion.


No, I wish to examine that which particular individuals have come to conclude about God and religion as that relates to the behaviors they choose from day to day as that relates to what they imagine the fate of "I" to be after they die.

And given how the lives individuals live around the globe can vary in many extraordinarily profound ways, what on earth would it even mean to "objectify" their conflicting accounts of God and/or religion?

felix dakat wrote: To discover true religion you must find it in yourself. So yes it's all about you.


Okay, let's examine this in the context of human history. Countless people have either been indoctrinated as children to embody the one "true religion", or they took to their own paths and came to conclude that the one "true religion" was their own. And, so far, historically, that has engendered a lot of them: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_r ... traditions

Now, how about you? What are the odds that the spiritual path that you are on "here and now" is indeed the one true path.

Or, instead, is the belief that there is one true path of more importance to the religious objectivists?

Their own is just what it happens to be.

As for the OP...

To paraphrase CG Jung, wholeness is a gift which can't be fabricated by art or science. You have to grow into it.


...let's bring that down to earth and explore the idea of "wholeness" by intertwining it into a particular context where we might come upon conflicting points of view regarding that which is of most interest to me: the existential relationship between morality and immortality.


Read my signature line. The approach to religion which you take over and over again is essentially off-topic as far as this thread is concerned. I'm not interested in getting into a dispute with you.
Last edited by felix dakat on Mon Aug 24, 2020 7:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
The purpose of my life would seem to be to express the truth as I discover it, but in such a manner that it is completely devoid of authority. By having no authority, by being seen by all as utterly unreliable, I express the truth and put everyone in a contradictory position where they can only save themselves by making the truth their own.
Soren Kierkegaard– Journals, 432
User avatar
felix dakat
Janitor
 
Posts: 8871
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:20 am
Location: east of eden

Re: Wholeness

Postby iambiguous » Mon Aug 24, 2020 7:46 pm

felix dakat wrote:
iambiguous wrote:
felix dakat wrote: You wish to objectify religion.


No, I wish to examine that which particular individuals have come to conclude about God and religion as that relates to the behaviors they choose from day to day as that relates to what they imagine the fate of "I" to be after they die.

And given how the lives individuals live around the globe can vary in many extraordinarily profound ways, what on earth would it even mean to "objectify" their conflicting accounts of God and/or religion?

felix dakat wrote: To discover true religion you must find it in yourself. So yes it's all about you.


Okay, let's examine this in the context of human history. Countless people have either been indoctrinated as children to embody the one "true religion", or they took to their own paths and came to conclude that the one "true religion" was their own. And, so far, historically, that has engendered a lot of them: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_r ... traditions

Now, how about you? What are the odds that the spiritual path that you are on "here and now" is indeed the one true path.

Or, instead, is the belief that there is one true path of more importance to the religious objectivists?

Their own is just what it happens to be.

As for the OP...

To paraphrase CG Jung, wholeness is a gift which can't be fabricated by art or science. You have to grow into it.


...let's bring that down to earth and explore the idea of "wholeness" by intertwining it into a particular context where we might come upon conflicting points of view regarding that which is of most interest to me: the existential relationship between morality and immortality.


Read my signature line. The approach to religion which you take over and over again it's essentially off-topic as far as this thread is concerned. I'm not interested in getting into a dispute with you.


Note to others:

What does this tell you about his own "general description intellectual contraption" approach to wholeness?

Probably not the same thing it tells me. :wink:

Not to worry: I'm outta here.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
User avatar
iambiguous
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 37617
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 8:03 pm
Location: baltimore maryland

Re: Wholeness

Postby felix dakat » Mon Aug 24, 2020 8:11 pm

Iambiguous. To me wholeness is at least a mental image and an ideal. Symbols of wholeness in world mythology, dreams and art are evidence that it is more than just me who sees it that way. But my approach is phenomenological. I don't make absolute claims to ultimate knowledge of morality or the afterlife which is what you say you're are interested in.
The purpose of my life would seem to be to express the truth as I discover it, but in such a manner that it is completely devoid of authority. By having no authority, by being seen by all as utterly unreliable, I express the truth and put everyone in a contradictory position where they can only save themselves by making the truth their own.
Soren Kierkegaard– Journals, 432
User avatar
felix dakat
Janitor
 
Posts: 8871
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:20 am
Location: east of eden

Re: Wholeness

Postby felix dakat » Tue Aug 25, 2020 8:06 pm

A pyramid is a three-dimensional quaternal mandala and symbol of psychological integration and individuation.
The purpose of my life would seem to be to express the truth as I discover it, but in such a manner that it is completely devoid of authority. By having no authority, by being seen by all as utterly unreliable, I express the truth and put everyone in a contradictory position where they can only save themselves by making the truth their own.
Soren Kierkegaard– Journals, 432
User avatar
felix dakat
Janitor
 
Posts: 8871
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:20 am
Location: east of eden

Re: Wholeness

Postby felix dakat » Wed Aug 26, 2020 2:06 pm

felix dakat wrote:A pyramid is a three-dimensional quaternal mandala and symbol of psychological integration and individuation.

In a pyramid the center is also the peak the highest place.
The purpose of my life would seem to be to express the truth as I discover it, but in such a manner that it is completely devoid of authority. By having no authority, by being seen by all as utterly unreliable, I express the truth and put everyone in a contradictory position where they can only save themselves by making the truth their own.
Soren Kierkegaard– Journals, 432
User avatar
felix dakat
Janitor
 
Posts: 8871
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:20 am
Location: east of eden

Re: Wholeness

Postby felix dakat » Wed Aug 26, 2020 5:02 pm

felix dakat wrote:
felix dakat wrote:A pyramid is a three-dimensional quaternal mandala and symbol of psychological integration and individuation.

In a pyramid the center is also the peak the highest place.


Jung was committed to the quarternio and double quarternio structure of the human Self. He believed that human preoccupation with the four-sided figures reflected the structural reality of the collective unconscious. Recall how in his book psychological types he explains the four functions of intuition, sensation, thinking and feeling. He represented the totality of the archetypal self including the conscious and the unconscious as an octahedron which is essentially one pyramid on top of another, the peaks facing in opposite directions.
The purpose of my life would seem to be to express the truth as I discover it, but in such a manner that it is completely devoid of authority. By having no authority, by being seen by all as utterly unreliable, I express the truth and put everyone in a contradictory position where they can only save themselves by making the truth their own.
Soren Kierkegaard– Journals, 432
User avatar
felix dakat
Janitor
 
Posts: 8871
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:20 am
Location: east of eden

Re: Wholeness

Postby felix dakat » Tue Sep 01, 2020 5:58 pm

felix dakat wrote:
felix dakat wrote:
felix dakat wrote:A pyramid is a three-dimensional quaternal mandala and symbol of psychological integration and individuation.

In a pyramid the center is also the peak the highest place.


Jung was committed to the quarternio and double quarternio structure of the human Self. He believed that human preoccupation with the four-sided figures reflected the structural reality of the collective unconscious. Recall how in his book psychological types he explains the four functions of intuition, sensation, thinking and feeling. He represented the totality of the archetypal self including the conscious and the unconscious as an octahedron which is essentially one pyramid on top of another, the peaks facing in opposite directions.


It's important to not try to become whole in one quadrant and neglect the other three. Figure out where you are weakest and start working on connecting with that part of yourself.

All healing comes through the numinous, the encounter with the sacred. Ordinary people are not going to make it through this time.
The purpose of my life would seem to be to express the truth as I discover it, but in such a manner that it is completely devoid of authority. By having no authority, by being seen by all as utterly unreliable, I express the truth and put everyone in a contradictory position where they can only save themselves by making the truth their own.
Soren Kierkegaard– Journals, 432
User avatar
felix dakat
Janitor
 
Posts: 8871
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:20 am
Location: east of eden

Re: Wholeness

Postby iambiguous » Tue Sep 01, 2020 6:33 pm

Note to others:

What does this tell you about his own "general description intellectual contraption" approach to wholeness?

Probably not the same thing it tells me. :wink:

Not to worry: I'm outta here.


felix dakat wrote: Iambiguous. To me wholeness is at least a mental image and an ideal.


At least? Until you take the mental image and the ideal and situate them out in a world where there are conflicting moral and political assessments of "wholeness", they remain [for me] just mental images and ideals.

felix dakat wrote: Symbols of wholeness in world mythology, dreams and art are evidence that it is more than just me who sees it that way. But my approach is phenomenological. I don't make absolute claims to ultimate knowledge of morality or the afterlife which is what you say you're are interested in.


What symbols relating to what human interactions in what dreams or works of art? And if you don't make claims "to ultimate knowledge of morality or the afterlife" then how would you describe wholeness in particular contexts in which morality and the afterlife are clearly relevant?

My claims revolve around the components raised in the arguments I make in my signature threads. Thus I am always interested to how others react to them. And how they have come to understand their own "I" differently in regard to "morality here and now and immortality there and then".

Wholeness there.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
User avatar
iambiguous
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 37617
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 8:03 pm
Location: baltimore maryland

Re: Wholeness

Postby felix dakat » Wed Sep 02, 2020 4:34 pm

felix dakat wrote: Iambiguous. To me wholeness is at least a mental image and an ideal.


iambiguous wrote:At least? Until you take the mental image and the ideal and situate them out in a world where there are conflicting moral and political assessments of "wholeness", they remain [for me] just mental images and ideals.


OK. No problem. Think of what I'm doing here however you like or not at all. Your mental images and ideals are unique and directly experienced only by you. My approach is based on archetypal psychology and involves becoming more aware of one's own internal imagery. If it doesn't work for you, I'm sorry.

felix dakat wrote: Symbols of wholeness in world mythology, dreams and art are evidence that it is more than just me who sees it that way. But my approach is phenomenological. I don't make absolute claims to ultimate knowledge of morality or the afterlife which is what you say you're are interested in.


iambiguous wrote:What symbols relating to what human interactions in what dreams or works of art? And if you don't make claims "to ultimate knowledge of morality or the afterlife" then how would you describe wholeness in particular contexts in which morality and the afterlife are clearly relevant?


See the link below for a description of some symbols of wholeness and some contexts in which they are found. I don't know what your latter question means in the context of my provisional and phenomenological assertions. You have described your experience as fragmented which is the opposite of wholeness and implies an awareness of it. I'm on my own path and must do my own work. Only you can do the work for you using your inner knowledge of yourself. I can't.

https://www.mindfueldaily.com/livewell/ ... wholeness/
The purpose of my life would seem to be to express the truth as I discover it, but in such a manner that it is completely devoid of authority. By having no authority, by being seen by all as utterly unreliable, I express the truth and put everyone in a contradictory position where they can only save themselves by making the truth their own.
Soren Kierkegaard– Journals, 432
User avatar
felix dakat
Janitor
 
Posts: 8871
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:20 am
Location: east of eden

Re: Wholeness

Postby felix dakat » Sat Sep 05, 2020 1:54 am

The purpose of my life would seem to be to express the truth as I discover it, but in such a manner that it is completely devoid of authority. By having no authority, by being seen by all as utterly unreliable, I express the truth and put everyone in a contradictory position where they can only save themselves by making the truth their own.
Soren Kierkegaard– Journals, 432
User avatar
felix dakat
Janitor
 
Posts: 8871
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:20 am
Location: east of eden

Re: Wholeness

Postby felix dakat » Sat Sep 05, 2020 2:51 pm

felix dakat wrote:


I see Blake's song/poem to Tirzah as a Gnostic lament of the fall from the wholeness of the pleroma of pure potentiality into the limitations of corporeal existence.
The purpose of my life would seem to be to express the truth as I discover it, but in such a manner that it is completely devoid of authority. By having no authority, by being seen by all as utterly unreliable, I express the truth and put everyone in a contradictory position where they can only save themselves by making the truth their own.
Soren Kierkegaard– Journals, 432
User avatar
felix dakat
Janitor
 
Posts: 8871
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:20 am
Location: east of eden

Re: Wholeness

Postby felix dakat » Tue Sep 15, 2020 1:28 am

This rediscovery of existentialism has a great significance for theology. It has seen the dark elements in man as over against a philosophy of consciousness which lays all the stress on man's conscious decisions and his good will. The existentialists allied themselves with Freud's analysis of the unconscious in protest against a psychology of consciousness which had previously existed. Existentialism and psychotherapeutic psychology are natural allies and have always worked together. This rediscovery of the unconscious in man is of the highest importance for theology. It has changed the moralistic and idealistic types which we have discussed; it has placed the question of the human condition at the center of all theological thinking, and for this reason it has made the answers meaningful again. In this light we can say that existentialism and Freud, together with his followers and friends (especially Jung and the archetypal psychologists*), have become the providential allies of Christian theology in the twentieth century. This is similar to the way in which the Marxist analysis of the structure of society became a tremendous factor in arousing the churches to a sense of responsibility for the social conditions in which men live.

PAUL TILLICH A History of Christian Thought From Its Judaic and Hellenistic Origins to Existentialism

* Felix
The purpose of my life would seem to be to express the truth as I discover it, but in such a manner that it is completely devoid of authority. By having no authority, by being seen by all as utterly unreliable, I express the truth and put everyone in a contradictory position where they can only save themselves by making the truth their own.
Soren Kierkegaard– Journals, 432
User avatar
felix dakat
Janitor
 
Posts: 8871
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:20 am
Location: east of eden

PreviousNext

Return to Religion and Spirituality



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users